Sunday, April 04, 2010

The Call Of Spring

I still have the call of spring in my blood from my time in Northern Vermont. On the first week of spring one takes their car out early into the morning into the unknown. I gather my LT jersey and a box of CDS and hit the road. The car drifts seamlessly across the landscape as exotic scenery passes by.

I can not grasp why but the urge to do this again has hit me strongly. Unfortunately, my nephew needs my car and I will have to settle for less. It has been five years since I went on vacation and my spirit could use some R&R.

I was planning to see route 210 in Maine, but by the time my nephew's classes are over it will be tourist season. I understand the economy is tough and he needs my car more than I do. I miss the days of taking out the car across the North seeking the unknown.

My passport should be there by then but the moment will have passed. It is more important to be a good relative. I will have to settle for adventure closer to home. I will be joining the Guyanese Church trip to Atlantic City. However, that is not exactly my type of fun as I enjoyed the old Atlantic City better. I miss the huge planters Peanut Shop and the amusement arcade and small aquariums.

13 comments:

Always On Watch said...

Five years since a vacation? You need one, then!

Feel free to come to the D.C. area anytime! July and August can be hot, hot, hot; but from now through June, the weather here is glorious.

The Pagan Temple said...

Beak, I'm going to make you my adopted uncle. Can I kindly borrow your house for a while. I'll only need it for a couple of weeks. You can buy yourself a nice tent and camping equipment at Goodies

The Pagan Temple said...

Translation-

Get your ass up to Vermont while you have the chance to do what you want to do. If your nephew wanted to borrow your sidearm would you loan him that as well?

I would love to go to Vermont and get me a few jars of fresh Vermont maple syrup.

Ducky's here said...

If you head down Maine, do remember to brake.

Topsham, MAINE
1 dead, 2 hurt after hitting moose on I-295
Police say a 50-year-old man was killed when the car in which he was a passenger struck a moose on Interstate 295 in Topsham. Maine State Police said Jose Jarez of Scarborough died Saturday night after the car driven by his brother, Jorge Jarez, struck the animal on the highway. Jorge Jarez suffered minor injuries. Moments after the collision, a car driven by 22-year-old Meghan Glancy of Woolwich also struck the moose, overturned, and skidded on its roof. Police say Glancy suffered back and neck injuries and was taken by helicopter to Central Maine Medical Center in Lewiston. (AP)

CM said...

How sweet you are.

I would like to borrow $1.500 for a Teepee and poles, then I will rent it out to you when you come thru Oklahoma! juss kidding.

Actually I can't say no to my Grandkids either nor my nephews...actually any family members, if I have it, its theirs.

CM

beamish said...

I drove with the windows down until I amplified the pollen count in my nose by a factor of 1000 and sneezed until I ran over 23 people.

Alligator said...

Beak, if you go to Guyana beware of a few things, especially if decide to take a "dip" in some local waters.

Guyana is prime habitat for the Amazonian giant leech
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0305/01-hunt-flash.html
At 18 inches length, three or four could drain you dry.

Guyana is also home to the Black Caiman, a crocodilian that reaches 16 feet in length.
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/cnhc/csp_mnig.htm
Not a notorious man eater like African Nile crocs, but humans have been known to fall prey.

Then there is the tiny Candiru catfish, a blood sucker that swims into your body orifices to feed on you. Piranhas are nothing in comparison.
http://animal.discovery.com/fish/river-monsters/candiru-catfish/
Don't pee in the water!

And let's not forget snakes. In the water we have the 30 foot Green Anaconda, which has a vile temper when disturbed even if it is not hungry (it eats the caimans). On dry land we have the Bushmaster, the most venous snake in the western hemisphere, and a large assortment of very large and highly venomous spiders, scorpions and some centipedes that are 16 inches long.

I'll skip the toxic and prickly plants and the ordinary stuff like mosquitoes. Just do exactly what your guides tell you (tip them well so they will tell you Gringo the right thing to do) Have a safe and enjoyable trip! :-)

beakerkin said...

I am traveling with natives who are familiar with the terrain.

Amazonian Giant Leech.

I was looking forward to seeing the Black Caiman. I thought it topped out at 8ft.

I will have to check again

CM said...

Maine seems so much safer!

I heard it was beautiful. Reading Thoreaus' description of Maine in the 1800s its sad to know how beautiful it was in his time, and yet he wondered how much more bountiful and beautiful it was with all its animal inhabitants, plants and natural forests before the Euros landed in the 1600s.

I read this, Thoreau's romantics' lament for the pristine world of an earlier and now lost time.....I'd say he was a man who loved our land.

A much safer civilized land than Guiana...take plenty of snake repellent, Comanches use a root called eetsa' to repell snakes, however I don't know if it would work on an anaconda!

CM

beakerkin said...

CM

I will be traveling with locals on the Berbice River.

Alligator said...

Beak the Brown aka Spectacled Caiman tops out at 8 feet, the Black is definitely twice that size. Then they have Dwarf Caimen which top out at 3 feet, but they tend to stay in small feeder creeks and pools under the forest canopy.

Follow that link I gave you. Adam Britton is one of the top croc experts in the world.

Capt. Spald...Spaulding said...

I remember the time I was fishing for monster peacock bass (Sargento)wading chest deep in the murky water (to stay cool) of a remote lake deep within the equatorial jungle of the Panamanian Darien. It was rumored that 20 foot caimen were inhabiting the lake but we paid them no mind after shoot out the eyes of a few, which made the rest of them quite timid.

Capt. Spald...Spaulding said...

Personally, I believe you won't find a more knowledgeable croc behavioral expert than the Aussie naturalist (The Barefoot Bushman/Aussie Vietnam Veteran.) Rob Bredl. Remember seeing his TV show called Killer Instinct?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT75_y6WmKs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8h5yNlMIgA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QkY-JcBYaM&feature=related